2 papers accepted to ACC 19

Our papers on voltage collapse stabilization [1] and coordinating distribution system resources in energy and ancillary service transmission system markets [2] have been accepted to 2019 American Control Conference!

[1] [doi] C. Avraam, J. Rines, A. Sarker, F. Paganini, and E. Mallada, “Voltage Collapse Stabilization in Star DC Networks,” in American Control Conference, 2019, pp. 1957-1964.
[Bibtex] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

Voltage collapse is a type of blackout-inducing dynamic instability that occurs when the power demand exceeds the maximum power that can be transferred through the network. The traditional (preventive) approach to avoid voltage collapse is based on ensuring that the network never reaches its maximum capacity. However, such an approach leads to inefficiencies as it prevents operators to fully utilize the network resources and does not account for unprescribed events. To overcome this limitation, this paper seeks to initiate the study of voltage collapse stabilization. More precisely, for a DC network, we formulate the problem of voltage stability as a dynamic problem where each load seeks to achieve a constant power consumption by updating its conductance as the voltage changes. We show that such a system can be interpreted as a dynamic game, where each player (load) seeks to myopically maximize their utility, and where every stable power flow solution amounts to a Local Nash Equilibrium. Using this framework, we show that voltage collapse is equivalent to the non-existence of a Local Nash Equilibrium in the game and, as a result, it is caused by the lack of cooperation between loads. Finally, we propose a Voltage Collapse Stabilizer (VCS) controller that uses (flexible) loads that are willing to cooperate and provides a fair allocation of the curtailed demand. Our solution stabilizes voltage collapse even in the presence of non-cooperative loads. Numerical simulations validate several features of our controllers.

@inproceedings{arspm2019acc,
  abstract = {Voltage collapse is a type of blackout-inducing dynamic instability that occurs when the power demand exceeds the maximum power that can be transferred through the network. The traditional (preventive) approach to avoid voltage collapse is based on ensuring that the network never reaches its maximum capacity. However, such an approach leads to inefficiencies as it prevents operators to fully utilize the network resources and does not account for unprescribed events. To overcome this limitation, this paper seeks to initiate the study of voltage collapse stabilization.

More precisely, for a DC network, we formulate the problem of voltage stability as a dynamic problem where each load seeks to achieve a constant power consumption by updating its conductance as the voltage changes. We show that such a system can be interpreted as a dynamic game, where each player (load) seeks to myopically maximize their utility, and where every stable power flow solution amounts to a Local Nash Equilibrium.

Using this framework, we show that voltage collapse is equivalent to the non-existence of a Local Nash Equilibrium in the game and, as a result, it is caused by the lack of cooperation
between loads. Finally, we propose a Voltage Collapse Stabilizer (VCS) controller that uses (flexible) loads that are willing to cooperate and provides a fair allocation of the curtailed demand. Our solution stabilizes voltage collapse even in the presence of non-cooperative loads. Numerical simulations validate several features of our controllers.},
  author = {Avraam, C. and Rines, J. and Sarker, A. and Paganini, F. and Mallada, E.},
  booktitle = {American Control Conference},
  doi = {10.23919/ACC.2019.8814708},
  grants = {CAREER-1752362,EPCN-1711188,ENERGISE-DE-EE0008006,ARO-W911NF-17-1-0092,EPCN-1711188,CPS-1544771},
  keywords = {Power Networks},
  month = {06},
  pages = {1957-1964},
  pubstate = {presented, submitted Sep. 2018},
  title = {Voltage Collapse Stabilization in Star DC Networks},
  url = {https://mallada.ece.jhu.edu/pubs/2019-ACC-ARSPM.pdf},
  year = {2019}
}
[2] [doi] C. Ji, M. H. Hajiesmaili, D. F. Gayme, and E. Mallada, “Coordinating Distribution System Resources for Co-optimized Participation in Energy and Ancillary Service Transmission System Markets,” in American Control Conference, 2019, pp. 1315-1322.
[Bibtex] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

This paper investigates the potential of using aggregate controllable loads and energy storage systems from multiple heterogeneous feeders to jointly optimize a utility’s energy procurement cost from the real-time market and their revenue from ancillary service markets. Toward this, we formulate an optimization problem that co-optimizes real-time and energy reserve markets based on real-time and ancillary service market prices, along with available solar power, storage and demand data from each of the feeders within a single distribution network. The optimization, which includes all network system constraints, provides real/reactive power and energy storage set-points for each feeder as well as a schedule for the aggregate system’s participation in the two types of markets. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm using several trace-driven simulations based on a real-world circuit of a New Jersey utility. The results demonstrate that active participation through controllable loads and storage significantly reduces the utility’s net costs, i.e., real-time energy procurement costs minus ancillary market revenues.

@inproceedings{jhgm2019acc,
  abstract = {This paper investigates the potential of using aggregate controllable loads and energy storage systems from multiple heterogeneous feeders to jointly optimize a utility's energy procurement cost from the real-time market and their revenue from ancillary service markets. Toward this, we formulate an optimization problem that co-optimizes real-time and energy reserve markets based on real-time and ancillary service market prices, along with available solar power, storage and demand data from each of the feeders within a single distribution network. The optimization, which includes all network system constraints, provides real/reactive power and energy storage set-points for each feeder as well as a schedule for the aggregate system's participation in the two types of markets. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm using several trace-driven simulations based on a real-world circuit of a New Jersey utility. The results demonstrate that active participation through controllable loads and storage significantly reduces the utility's net costs, i.e., real-time energy procurement costs minus ancillary market revenues.},
  author = {Ji, Chengda and Hajiesmaili, Mohammad H. and Gayme, Dennice F. and Mallada, Enrique},
  booktitle = {American Control Conference},
  doi = {10.23919/ACC.2019.8815242},
  grants = {CAREER-1752362, ENERGISE-DE-EE0008006, EPCN-1711188},
  month = {06},
  pages = {1315-1322},
  pubstate = {presented, submitted Sep. 2018},
  title = {Coordinating Distribution System Resources for Co-optimized Participation in Energy and Ancillary Service Transmission System Markets},
  url = {https://mallada.ece.jhu.edu/pubs/2019-ACC-JHGM.pdf},
  year = {2019}
}