Control Seminar @ University of Michigan

I gave a talk on “Inverter-based Control for Low Inertia Power Systems” in the Control Seminar at the University of Michigan. Related publications include [1, 2, 3].

[1] Unknown bibtex entry with key [pm2018a-preprint]
[Bibtex]
[2] Unknown bibtex entry with key [pm2018b-preprint]
[Bibtex]
[3] [doi] Y. Jiang, R. Pates, and E. Mallada, “Performance tradeoffs of dynamically controlled grid-connected inverters in low inertia power systems,” in 56th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), 2017, pp. 5098-5105.
[Bibtex] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

Implementing frequency response using grid-connected inverters is one of the popular proposed alternatives to mitigate the dynamic degradation experienced in low inertia power systems. However, such solution faces several challenges as inverters do not intrinsically possess the natural response to power fluctuations that synchronous generators have. Thus, to synthetically generate this response, inverters need to take frequency measurements, which are usually noisy, and subsequently make changes in the output power, which are therefore delayed. This paper explores the system-wide performance tradeoffs that arise when measurement noise, delayed actions, and power disturbances are considered in the design of dynamic controllers for grid-connected inverters. Using a recently proposed dynamic droop (iDroop) control for grid-connected inverters that is inspired by classical first order lead-lag compensation, we show that the sets of parameters that result in highest noise attenuation, power disturbance mitigation, and delay robustness do not necessarily have a common intersection. In particular, lead compensation is desired in systems where power disturbances are the predominant source of degradation, while lag compensation is a better alternative when the system is dominated by delays or frequency noise. Our analysis further shows that iDroop can outperform the standard droop alternative in both joint noise and disturbance mitigation, and delay robustness.

@inproceedings{jpm2017cdc,
  abstract = {Implementing frequency response using grid-connected inverters is one of the popular proposed alternatives to mitigate the dynamic degradation experienced in low inertia power systems. However, such solution faces several challenges as inverters do not intrinsically possess the natural response to power fluctuations that synchronous generators have. Thus, to synthetically generate this response, inverters need to take frequency measurements, which are usually noisy, and subsequently make changes in the output power, which are therefore delayed. This paper explores the system-wide performance tradeoffs that arise when measurement noise, delayed actions, and power disturbances are considered in the design of dynamic controllers for grid-connected inverters. 
Using a recently proposed dynamic droop (iDroop) control for grid-connected inverters that is inspired by classical first order lead-lag compensation, we show that the sets of parameters that result in highest noise attenuation, power disturbance mitigation, and delay robustness do not necessarily have a common intersection. In particular, lead compensation is desired in systems where power disturbances are the predominant source of degradation, while lag compensation is a better alternative when the system is dominated by delays or frequency noise. Our analysis further shows that iDroop can outperform the standard droop alternative in both joint noise and disturbance mitigation, and delay robustness.},
  author = {Jiang, Yan and Pates, Richard and Mallada, Enrique},
  booktitle = {56th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC)},
  doi = {10.1109/CDC.2017.8264414},
  grants = {1544771, 1711188, W911NF-17-1-0092},
  keywords = {Power Networks},
  month = {12},
  pages = {5098-5105},
  title = {Performance tradeoffs of dynamically controlled grid-connected inverters in low inertia power systems},
  url = {https://mallada.ece.jhu.edu/pubs/2017-CDC-JPM.pdf},
  year = {2017}
}